The Retail Internet Of Things (IOT): Turning Your Store Into An App

Tuesday, 21 October 2014 07:20: Gary Schwartz

Retailers are an innovative bunch. We adopt and trial new technologies at a more nimble rate that other verticals. In a world where shopper marketing, field marketing and consumer insights have all been merged into an unending list of “mobile path-to-purchase” solutions, the retailer gets an A for effort.

Before we celebrate our successes, let’s look at another vertical: Cities. Like stores, their consumers are changing, their services need to adapt. IBM invested approximately $350 million in smart city technology and marketing trying to reinvent the metropolitan centers globally and have perhaps made 10 % return on this effort. But 557,000 cities spend $4.5 trillion per year, 10% of the global GDP.

VP Schwartz head shot

According my colleague, Sascha Haselmayer, the CEO of CityMart in Barcelona, 0% of cities publish their needs, a mere 10% of cities engage with business that have new solutions and 70% only trust existing solution providers. Killer apps such as Shared Bicycles globally have taken 20 years to reach 0.1% of the market.

Why? Because cities look at a problem: Say, street lights for the blind and they focus on procuring a solution for street lights. Whereas, they should be looking to find a solution for the blind. Minnesota spent their budget on a talking street lights. Stockholm, on the other hand did not. It provided a device to its blind population that empowered them all the time (not just at street lights) and made them feel 90% less disabled and saved the city 20 million per year.

INNOVATORS UNITE!

Why am I talking about cities in an article on stores?

Because we need to understand the challenges we face and embrace what we do well in order to do it better.  Yes, are inundated with vendors that offer to change our world and it is a challenge to weed through the solutions and find pilots and trials. But we do.

I cannot tell you how many times I have sent an article on something that Jason Newport at Carat is doing with Macy’s and have been asked to investigate how we can do this in our store. Maybe it is because we feel that we are under siege in the retail vertical and need to trial and innovate?

Well to all the innovators that are reading this article, I want to ask you to explore a very simple sea change in the way you need to adapt the world in 2015. The retail mall, the city and the shopper are all about to change profoundly.

This change is not based on a technology as much as a new way of looking at the mobile landscape. Until now, we have seen the store as Minnesota saw their traffic light challenge: “How do we adapt our streetlights to service our blind population?”

Minnesota got their best and brightest on the task and solved this problem. However, we know that Minnesota should have asked a different question: “How do we best service our blind population?”

“Spend 90% of the time framing the question. And 10% on the solution,” as Albert Einstein once said.

Retailers are very good at finding solutions for “traffic lights.” We have trials and jettisoned countless solutions and won industry accolades for them in the process. We celebrate innovation but we often miss the ROI award.

THE APP STORE DILEMMA

What are the questions? Well perhaps they are:

  • “How do we drive more loyalty doorswing?”
  • “How do we better address showrooming in our stores?”
  • “How we build a better mobile app?”

Or maybe we need to refashion the questions with the independent, mobile empowered shopper at the center:

  • “How do I help the shopper find me?”
  • “How do I help the shopper reach the web through my portal?”
  • “What is a mobile app?”

Take our retail marketing departments. Our CMOs go to work every day and try to better position their products and services to the marketplace. They get to work and instead of marketing these products and services, they try and drive their app download.

Instead of marketing themselves they are marketing Apple.

Now, this understandable. Apple makes its money selling hardware. One of the reasons it has always succeeded is because it can bundle content seamlessly with an iPod or iPhone. To do this, Apple spends a large amount of its marketing dollars on helping developers. It publishes simple SDKs to help developers build better apps faster. Then they provide a virtual main street and allow retailers to publish their stores to their storefront.

There is nothing wrong with this; however, let me ask the following questions:

“What is a mobile app?” Could it be that our stores are apps? Could our shelves be apps? Could our products be apps? And the phone could be the trigger.

THE INTERNET OF THINGS

There is a new term in town, The Internet of Things (or IoT for those in the know). This is big. Why? Because it could force us to ask the correct questions.

The IoT is really an extension of good old machine-to-machine (M2M) communications. What the industry calls telemetry (tele – distance metry = measurement). With mobility, we have consumerized telemetry. Every modern phone has a compass, gyroscope, accelerometer ambient light sensor, proximity sensor, and many other ways of seeming sentient and smart. These sensors allow apps on your phone to also be smart and capture all sorts of information on the phone user and adapt accordingly. It also allows the app to transmit this data for medical, wellness, business needs to the cloud.

The phone was the first IoT thing. We took a rotary dial object, made it portable with a mobile network and then gave it all these smart sensors to allow it to be an ambient device.

In the IoT of 2015, everything you can shake a stick at has the potential of being an IoT thing. The lighting system in your store, the POS, the electric switches and garbage disposal units.  All inanimate things have the ability with sensor and business logic of becoming much more efficient and intelligent in their tasks.

So when a retailer looks at their store this year, do they want to think of putting their store on the app store or making their store into an app? When the digital web is becoming a physical web (See Google’s Github post: https://google.github.io/physical-web/),perhaps we need to repatriate the interactivity of our stores from the app store and infuse it into our bricks and mortar?

HOW DO WE MAKE OUR STORES INTO APPS?

Ah, good question. Well the first thing that many well says is use a $20 beacon. This is a good answer. If you have an investment in apps and need to connect the app to the store, a beacon is a good solution.

But if you want to go IoT on the status quo and put the store back in the center, start to delight your mobile consumer by offering smartphone like services in the aisle and counter.

Does your store have Wi-Fi? Well a mobile consumer is a connected consumer. Let them offload their social Wi-Fi data needs onto your network. Act as a gateway to the web and be the concierge.

If this simple move did not intimidate Apple, they would not have made such a privacy fuss about nothing by hashing the phone unique identifier. (Privacy for pseudonymous consumers can be addresses without Apple’s deus ex machina approach.)

Wi-Fi offers the store (from basic VAS to super enhanced value):

  1. A way of being a social concierge
  2. Basic heat mapping of the store
  3. A digital hub to drive manufacturer promotions and smart coop dollars
  4. A loyalty platform to opt in shoppers and tether their phone to a OTT communication channel like email or SMS.
  5. A IoT network where every store now can communicate directly to a loyalist phone without the need for an app download.
  6. A proximity smart digital out of home engagement network to allow the store to identify and based on certain business logic drive street to aisle marketing for itself and its manufacture partners.
  7. A media network that can not only ask for coop budget from their manufacture partners but real media dollars to drive targeted, proximity-based engagement.

The store becomes the smart IoT things and the phone becomes the IoT trigger. The investment is back in the store’s domain and cannot not be disintermentiated.

Tie this engagement to wallet and coupon, and the solution becomes more and more sexy. And you thought IoT was something futuristic? Start being the innovators you are and begin asking the right questions.

Read on RetailTouch Points @ http://www.retailtouchpoints.com/features/executive-viewpoints/the-retail-internet-of-things-iot-turning-your-store-into-an-app


Gary is the CEO of Impact Mobile, Inc. and author of The Impulse Economy and Fast Shopper, Slow Store, which were published by Simon & Schuster, Atria Imprint. He also is working on a new book, covering the Internet of Things as the new app store. Schwartz founded and chaired the mobile committee for the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) helping to establish a joint task force between the IAB, Mobile Marketing Association (MMA) and the Media Rating Council (MRC) to develop global mobile measurement standards for which he received an IAB award for industry excellence in 2009. He was elected for three terms as the Chairman of MEF North America and currently is the Global Director of Location Based Marketing Association; the Executive Chairman of 4More Innovation (Thinkwire platform on Twitter) and Special Adviser to The Wireless Registry.

Your Hotel & 50 Billion Things (60min keynote on the IOT)

HEDNA.org Brussels Conference, June 2014 Keynote by Gary Schwartz on the Internet of Things and how it impacts your hotels and the relationship you have with your guests.

hotel

While the phone will continue to connect people to people, it will increasingly connect machine to machine. The new phone will amplify, control and navigate the world around us. Many call this the Internet of Things (IOT).

The IOT is about how to talk to your washing machine as your friend. Maintain a relationship with your baby as if you were beside them in the crib. It is about finally having the basketball tell you how it thinks you have played and could improve your game. It is about having plants talk to you and shoes become your eyes. It is about clicking, signalling calling, texting, waving, approaching inanimate things and making them into digital, active, responsive stuff.

The digital app store is expanding to a new app store of objects for our home, work, and travel.

Mobile Black Swans and Turkeys

Part I: Tame Turkeys

On the return flight home for Thanksgiving this week, I read Nassim Taleb’s book The Black Swan and decided that tis the season to draw profound parallels between innovation and poultry.

And so while busy stuffing the family turkey I thought about how this all applied to my world of consumer engagement, retail sales and payment.

Here are my insights:

  • Chickens: Bertrand Russell’s wrote an anecdote about the benevolent farmer in 1912. The fat and happy chicken thinks the farmer is a benevolent protector until it is hauled away to the slaughter house.
  • Turkeys:  Nassim Taleb, in his book The Black Swan, says that the same holds true for the Thanksgiving turkey. However, he adds that the surprise for a turkey is not a surprise to its butcher.
  • Swans: So the black-swan question for the marketing community is: How do we play the role of the butcher not the turkey?

Moving your retail business from a step-by-step evolutionary growth to revolutionary, black swan transformation is not easy. In fact, it may be impossible. Corporations find it difficult to reinvent from within. However, to be aware of the nature of outliers and revolutionary innovation is a good first step.

You can rename your CIO: Chief Innovation Office, your CTO: Chief Transformation Officer and your CDO: Chief Disruption Officer. However this is all for nought if they cannot identify swans or at least the turkeys.

Look to social media. There is a succession of ever faster black-swan innovations starting with email and ending in SnapChat’s self-destructing messaging. Microsoft did not anticipate Google search, Google did not anticipate Facebook communities; Facebook did not anticipate Twitter micro-blogging; the same holds true for Instagram’s social picture publishing or SnapChat’s peek-a-boo messaging.  The same applies to retail as well as broadcast, payments, health, advertising to name a few rudely disrupted verticals.

Retail payments is a classic chase-the-tail solution mashup. But payment vendors have been more astute. The FIs ran a two-sided business to establish MasterCard and VISA credit services. The FIs have fought to be a part of any POS and prepaid activity in retail. With the emergence of digital payment, payment incumbents have aggressively invested and acquired companies in the mobile POS space (VISA/Square) and as well as in the cloud (VISA/Playspan).

VISA’s purchase of PlaySpan was particularly forward thinking. PlaySpan allowed gamers to buy virtual swords and pumpkin seeds for their virtual battle grounds and farms without leaving the game. Frictionless commerce engineering: meet VISA’s present day  V.me.

But even leviathans like VISA and MasterCard have been sidelined to commodity commerce rails.While they make nice transactional revenue, Amazon, iTunes, PayPal and Playstore and other consumer commerce portals have made the card credentials second fiddle. They discount the interchange and grab the CRM and big data.

Shopper marketing, Shopper engagement all follow similar twists. But not always evolutionary:

SMS was the black swan technology revolutionizing communication for the unsuspecting (but delighted) wireless carriers. We all thought QR codes, mobile apps and NFC would supplant this messaging channel.  WhatApp, Skype and Viber all have eaten away at the peer-to-peer traffic; however, for brands, SMS, and for some successful apps, the notification channel, remains the main opt-in and content delivery channel of choice.

Black swan on the horizon? iBeacons, WiFi Direct or LTE Direct? Maybe.

Proximity engagement is essential for a brand or retailer to drive path into purchase.  Shopkick and Beacons are valuable but are ultimately broadcast solutions.  Future solutions such as LTE Direct promise to extend the retail network and add more intelligence and peer to peer interactivity to this engagement.

However, in all the above cases it is difficult, if not impossible, to identify one strategy, vendor, agency that will bring revolutionary black swan ideas.

When attending events whether speaking or listening, it all seems so easy. Innovate they say. . .

Well so my friends, the innovator’s dilemma maybe just to avoid becoming the turkey.

Happy Thanksgiving!

 

The 2014 Ad Game Changer: Digital Maps

Gary Schwartz (16 September, 2013)

Of all the widgets and long-forgotten apps on your phone the one with most mobile mindshare is your map app. We have become a mobile society, and in the 2010s, map apps personify our wanderlust. When we open our mobile map, we have intent, direction and purpose. It is vitamin “M”: the ultimate upper and highly addictive.

And map real estate is hot: Apple buys Locationary, Embark and HopStop; Google buys Waze;  Bing is rumored to be in talks with FourSquare; Zillow, the map real estate tycoon, buys EasyStreet, and indoor mapping app company, Aisle411 raises a hefty seed round in the valley. As OEMs beef up their services, we are entering a new phase of map building. Location has always been a data grab. Now, the industry is starting to focus on monetising subway stops, street corners and highways across the world.

The principal challenge is that maps are a new and unique advertising paradigm, and the incumbent search business models, mostly designed for the web’s previous era as a stationary, desktop experience may need to be adjusted.
Galileo to Google

Google Maps, the grand daddy of digital mapping, was born in 2004 as a skunk works project by two Danish brothers in Australia.

First designed as a heavy client app, in 2004 the software came full circle as Lars Rasmussen and his brother were acquired by Google after making a web-based pitch. The same year, Google acquired Keyhole, Inc. and proceeded to use Keyhole’s mark-up language to launch Google Earth in 2005.

During the next five years, Google started to revolutionize digital maps. It is quite possibly the most exciting innovation effort by the company. Not since map mavericks Ptolomy, Copernicus and Galileo has mapping accelerated so profoundly. Within a few short years Google has redefined the way we see the world around us.

Google Maps rolled out road directions in North America in 2006 and their PC-based maps became the pre-GPS automotive assistant. However convenient and customizable, Google maps for the desktop were a print-on-demand version of London’s A-Z pocket maps. In many ways, a Google map printed out before a trip was no different from John Ogilby’s 1675 Britannia detailed strip maps that travels bought to find their way from Norfolk to Newmarket with inns, stables and other points-of-interest as well as clear directions and distances clearly marked. They balanced behind the horse on the coach seat as our laser-printed version would sit on our car dashboard.

But the small screen was the true game changer. The capacitive screen touch invented by Andrew Hsu, combined with the pinch-and-zoom mobile interface developed by Apple made complex map navigation simple, user friendly and, most importantly, mobile.

With multiscreen map adoption, Google Maps expanded. The company launched in Latin America and Asia, and started the subterranean mapping of subways in 2007. In 2008, a view from space; in 2009, a POV from the street and 3D rendering.  And more. Google mapped canals and bike paths, endangered forests and the ocean floors,  the moon and Mars and the ultimate conquest, Macy’s in-store experience.

This was phase one: Build a dominant innovative platform with simple APIs, establish market stickiness and trust by the point-A-to-point-B public.

Now add metadata

Google+ Local launched in 2012, allowing users to post reviews and images into pages hosted by third party sites. This year maps are becoming more customized, providing location-specific information on points-of-interest. While Google has maintained a focus on road navigation with its 2013 acquisition of the crowd sourcing road-warrior Waze software, the operative term on the new Google map is “explore.” Explore photos, recommendations, and restaurants.

Maps plus Google Glass makes the possibility of on-the-go exploration more immersive. Using the Google Mirror API developers can feed real-time GPS info and pre-rendered map images into the eye window of Glass wearers for “dexterous” driving, cycling or walking to the local mall. Glass becomes “a Segway for your head.” And taking maps to the edge of utility: Google Sky (which maps the stars based on your GPS location and vision angle) can be integration with Google Glass to show the outlines of constellations through a transparent filter to view the night sky.

Wow!

And then at the end of this epic journey, Google announces local advertising. Google Maps now allows short sections of advertisements to be placed directly onto the map itself. Local advertising is one of Google’s core business and Google Maps ad purchases are made through the same Google AdWords auction that buyers are already very familiar.

For Google this is simply a terrestrial version of browser-based search. When a consumer enters “Starbucks” in her browser, she finds links to buy “Starbucks Instant Coffee Bundle” on Amazon.com. When a consumer enters Starbucks in Google Maps, she finds local Starbucks to get the real deal (or if Tim Hortons is bidding, an ad for a competitively located Timmy’s coffee store.) Both these use cases involve path to purchase. One is virtual, the other is proximal.

Google hopes Map-based ads will follow the same digital success that Google has had with its search-based ads. Instead of auctioning AdWords at point-of-search, Google auctions ads at point-of-navigation.

Ptolemy what? There has to be more than just that. We’re just not fully there yet.

Don’t forget the Big Apple

Apple recognized the value of maps and knew that they had a Trojan Horse lurking in their mobile operating system in Google Maps. Google’s map app had become the dominant phonetop service with the most unique visitors of any app in-market. When Appl­e launched and preloaded its own proprietary map app in August 2012, Google’s traffic dropped making Facebook the winning app for unique impressions as well as time spend.

(After a few geographical faux pas) Apple started to establish its own relationship with the map consumer. But Google Mappers are loyal. When Google launched its new map app for iOS 6 in December there was a 30 per cent rush of Apple folk upgrading to the new operating system (MoPub.com). Affinity to a map app had influenced these consumers’ mobile behaviour. Quite remarkable.

However, Apple is committed to build a map following. While the company no longer needed to pay licensing to Google, which was good, the key reason for ousting Google Maps was that maps had become a data pillar. By replacing Google, Apple had direct access to a wealth of consumer data and potential advertising revenue.

Yahoo! Maps, Bing Maps, Nokia Maps, and MapQuest all use the NAVTEQ electronic map feed (best known for its automotive navigation services), and like Apple now, they own their own consumer data layer, which is crucial for generating advertising and marketing revenue on maps.

Bing is the major map contender.  In September, the company added 13 million square kilometers (316TB) of aircraft and satellite photography to its service. Microsoft’s large investment in Facebook in 2007 ($240 million) led to the 2013 decision adopt Bing as FaceBook’s mapping and search provider. To do this effectively, and compete with the market-leader, Google, Bing needs to beef up and differentiate its map offerings. Bing has already rolled out “Local Scout” which helps consumers find food and fun across all its screens. Rumors of a FourSquare acquisition (or possibly financing) may be part of this grand strategy.

(Microsoft acquisition of Nokia did not come with their HERE maps assets. Nokia’s HERE maps include road networks, traffic patterns and urban landscapes and as licensed by major properties such as Garmin, Oracle and Amazon.com. Will Nokia take the lead as the premier mapping and location services across different screens? Will they just sell off the asset to Apple after the Microsoft acquisition is complete?)

And the open-source mapping movement is also growing. Washington D.C.-based startup, MapBox, provides more custom navigation and interesting APIs built on top of Open Street Maps. Open is good and allows developers greater flexibility and affordability; Foursquare uses MapBox’s services to display its users’ check-in histories. However MapBox is not preloaded on your Android or Apple phone and while they have an iOS mapping SDK they have no Android footprint. MapBox will certainly play a roll as an embedded technology in sites all over the web; however, it is unlikely that they will be a standalone consumer utility on top of your phone and tablet.

With the proliferation of WiFi networks in retail, vendors such as Cisco drive mobile mapping solutions for shoppers that join the free network. The maps allows for hyper-local, custom mapping that includes restroom as well as promotional information on retail stores.

All of these digital map offerings are entering the mainstream at a time when advertisers are questioning consumer engagement on mobile, and trying to understand how best to follow their consumer in a contextual and relevant manner. Brands and retailers are re-evaluating the way we sell and, more importantly, engage across multiple screens. Their assumptions on path-to-purchase, built during the era of the desktop web, are no longer fully valid and reliable. The classic consumer narrative of home-to-store has changed and retailers and brand can no longer simply hire a Director of Shopper Insights and hope for the best.

Advertising and marketing is about providing a consistent message at aisle, and checkout, wherever the shopper finds the retailer. If the advertisers wants to get back in the game, possibly the most exciting place to be right now is on the map. When the consumer and shopper opens their map app when they have intent to meet someone, go somewhere or buy something. All this drives commerce. Maps provide unadulterated path-to-purchase.

Narrative: Going beyond advertising

So what is the new advertising paradigm for maps? Maps have layered functionality: terrain, roads, satellite, traffic, public transport and images. Then there is the exploration layer: recommendations and general points-of-interest. And now Google has provided an additional local advertising layer.

However, the adding an advertising layer may not prove to be effective in a map environment. There is more value to the exploration layer. Yes, maps help us move in a utilitarian fashion from Point-A to Point-B and that is why Waze and other transit acquisitions have been so important.  But maps also have a very non-utilitarian function.

Maps help the consumer simply “explore” and is what will ultimately connect map users to brands and content owners. Maps tell stories because precisely they have a beginning and an end, and are defined by intent and clear purpose.

Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook already situate the user’s photos and comments at a latitude and longitude: a country, a city, a bar. However these social graphs are not map applications and location is an important but secondary metatag.

The opportunity is to build a new bespoke map layer for brands and content owners. Think map first.

Startups such as Findery and CityMaps have map based UGC (user-generated content) engines. Where is the content input engine for brands? How can brands visualize content and actively map this data across all their customers’ screens?

One company called Mapiary, based out of Singapore, is developing the tools to allow brands and retailers to layer rich navigation onto the map. How can Unilever’s Becel margarine be more relevant to power walkers globally? Or how can Heineken weave narrative into a city pub crawl? Diageo, can map a DJ tour for Smirnoff. The NYTimes can map their 36-Hour travel series in a rich contextual manner. This is new digital cartouche and as important as the underlying map.

Where is the new vision of brand advertising? After all the innovation that Lars Rasmussen (Google Maps) and John Hanke (Google Earth) brought to maps we surely need to go beyond paid search models and allow owned content to become a rich and valuable layer in the 2014 map.

BNN Interview on the “Battle to Monetize Maps” discussing the positioning of Apple, Google & Microsoft. http://t.co/M1Pa0Qcijd 

Gary Schwartz is the CEO of Impact Mobile. Having been at the frontlines of the mobile industry for over a decade, Gary is the author of two books, “The Impulse Economy: Understanding Mobile Shoppers” and “Fast Shopper. Slow Store: A Guide to Courting and Capturing the Mobile Consumers,” both of which highlight the current state of the mobile commerce space and chronicle the significant impact that mobile is having on consumers, retailers and brands. Gary is also a chair emeritus for the Interactive Advertising Bureau and the Mobile Entertainment Forum NA and global director of the Location Based Marketing Association.

Mall Busting with Wal-Mart, Facebook & Zappos

Samsung strikes a deal with the beleaguered Best Buy to subsidize their rent with a store-in-a-store initiative. Borders exits the mall and last-man-standing Barnes & Noble seems to becoming a living room chachka vendor with more book browsers than book buyers. Zappos Labs runs field research in malls and Facebook launches a commerce strategy (again).

Is a retail dust bowl about to blow through the mall nationally? Or is this a digital tempest in a tea cup?

We know that online commerce is booming but it still accounts for a small slice of America’s mall business. Undeniably, this $200 billion digital business (ComScore) is expanding scope daily.

If there was ever a digital demarcator, it is the soap business. When Unilever and P&G, the markets main consumer package goods companies, begin to sell soap on Amazon, and when Wal-Mart begins to ramp up its online business, leveraging its 4,000 stories and 158 warehouses as an online distribution network, then mall property owners possibly need to rethink their role in bricks and mortar.

Inertia as a strategy

Malls are entertainment destinations. Always have been. We go to the mall for a movie or latte just as we bundled the family into the Buick 60 years ago to go shopping. But if Best Buy and Barnes & Noble leave the mall, what is left to attract the consumer? Hours of gizmo browsing and cook-book thumbing gone.

Browse-verse-buy business has whittled way the margins of many stores making Blockbuster and Gamestop digital road kill. It forced Target Chief Executive Gregg Steinhafel and Kathee Tesija, Target’s executive vice president of merchandising to cry uncle on “showrooming” in a memo to its suppliers in 2012.

However, muscling your supplier’s prices down is a pharic victory. Even with the volume sales of Target and Wal-Mart know that they need to move some of their business into the cloud. During Wal-Mart’s August 2013 earnings call it announced that eCommerce sales rose by 30 percent in two trailing quarters. Neil Ashe, Wal-Mart’s CEO indicated its total online sales could pass $10 billion in fiscal year 2014.  This is only two percent of the stores earning and only 12 percent of Amazon which sales totaled $61 billion in 2012 but it is a marked trend and a harbinger of the exodus of earns from the mall.

What incumbent stores presently have in their favor is inertia.  The cloud and the mall are still not fluidly connected. Although each shopper is armed with a mobile computer which has the capability of scanning, sourcing and saving the consumer in every aisle, there are too many hurdles and friction between the idea of digital buying and the products within arms reach.

The mandate of any red blooded digital retailers is to eliminate this inertia.

No-click Cloud Checkout

Apple’s iTunes, Amazon and Paypal built their business on simplifying checkout: making sure that the act of buying does not get in the way of intent to buy.

One-click checkout or combining stored customer credentials with a simple password is the sole reason that these companies continue to grow their market share. Their UX team would tell you that every informational and graphic design is based on optimizing clicks to checkout. Each click makes a precipitous drop off and abandoned shopping carts litter the web.

But digital checkout demands trust and mindshare. Even online real estate barons such as Facebook have been unable to enter this market.  Although “Social” and “commerce” seems natural allies, Facebook has not been able to delivered on its promise to leverage its millions of customers to shop cross-channel.  The company launched Facebook Credits in 2009 and phased them out last year. “F-commerce” experiments abound. Remember Facebook + Amazon + P&G partnering in 2010 to change the world. Unilever followed suit launching a storefront on Facebook for its Dove brand. Retailers including JCPenney and Gamestop have attempted to monetize their Facebook community by opening stores inside the Facebook network. After underwhelming results they shut their virtual doors.

Apple and Amazon have proven that community plus one-click checkout works. These digital wallet holders started their business explicitly to sell stuff. And they are poised to remove the inertia from online shopping and with it the last refuge of the mall owner. Online shopping provides advantages with an endless aisle allowing for access to more sizes and categories. According to Nielson the average basket size is much larger for consumer package goods ($80 online to $30 offline) and beauty purchase ($30 online to $10 offline).

The question is that when the households put soap and diapers on their shopping list will they log into Amazon to buy Dove Body Wash 24 Ounce Bottles (Pack of 4) and Pampers Sensitive Wipes 7x Box?

Baked Beans & Apple Pie

The last refuge of the American mall maybe a can of baked beans and fresh produce. If the household shopper wants to grabs a can for dinner tonight or smell the oranges and squeeze the melons before buying, then off to the store they will go. Grocery stores are big box convenience stores.

However, should mall owners that are grocery-anchored feel safe? Their clientele should come from a weekly shopping list.

Well, hold your Kraft peanut butter!

The traditional grocery retailers are faced with increased competition. In March, Wal-Mart opened grocery concept stores about a tenth of the size of their supercenters. With big box and online retailers entering the grocery space, specialty grocers capturing the “foodie culture” consumer and brands creating direct relationship with the consumer, perhaps this is not a safe bet for mall owners.

Google Wallet, ISIS and other phone wallets promise to make in-store shopping more digitally fluid, but what is the digital wallet never makes it to the mall.  Online grocery shopping has grown five fold over the past eight years to $25 billion. Tablets devices have made shopping more leisurely and couch commerce has accelerated.  With CPGs moving their diaper and detergent business into the mainstream online stores like Amazon, the inertia may soon come from the home.

Poaching People

Since Tesco opened their virtual grocery store on the subway in Seoul, Korea two years ago, scan and shop on-the-go signage has become more common. While it is still a media gimmick, it has the potential of becoming a way of luring the shopper online. In every mall or transit hub America at least one brand has attempted to use the in-mall media to engage with the shopper and move them into their cloud store.

In CNET interviews with Zappos Labs’ (an Amazon-owned online retailer) the Director, Will Young, confesses that his team sits around malls stalking shoppers. Their goal is to emulate these shoppers’ behavior online. Young is asking “How can you make the digital experience feel like the in-store experience?”

Whether they succeed or not, there is no question that malls need to re-evaluate their passive media deals. When a brand buys signage on an ad impression basis but uses this media to poach customers then this signage perhaps should not be sold as an impression but as a “mini-storefront”.

Mall owners nationally are holding strategy sessions to evaluate how technology is affecting their business. These stakeholders need to re-evaluate their real estate assets and start to see media as leasable square footage.

Part Two: Mapping the Mall (to be continued)

Starbucks: Helping Caffeinate and Juice Customers

by Gary Schwartz  (30/07/2013)

Starbucks Q3 2013 report is out: a 30 percent jump in My Starbucks Rewards spend and mobile app transactions in the US accounting for a whopping 10 percent of in-store US sales.

The only successful mobile wallet continues to grow market share

The one interesting development is the announcement that U.S.Starbucks is partnering with Duracell Power to provision in-store charging stations. With Starbucks’ success with its mobile wallet, the last thing the local Starbucks store wants is a dead phone at point-of-sale.

I have always said that wireless charging stations are honey to the wireless bee. Starbucks has already educated the consumer on the value of its retail network as a Wi-Fi network. Now it can it extend this utility to a charge-up affinity.

There are only two deleterious mobile states: a consumer with a lack of caffeine or lack of handset power. Starbucks in the natural brand to be associated with charging up.

 

MultiScreen not Omniscreens or Second-Screen

I strongly believe that the space between the screens that allows the brand to connect their consumer experience is critical. I call this “digital Velcro”.  Connecting your consumer screens seamlessly throughout their day is one of the most important challenges we face.

Additionally, one media experience plus other media screen experience equals a multiple of value to the brand: “1+1=3”  This is not a second screen debate. It is a consumer journey challenge that impacts all brands and retailers in their media buying and engaging. That is why we focus on the MultiScreen not the Omniscreens or Second-Screen discussion.

Next week on Tuesday and Wednesday in NYC I will be hosting the MultiScreen Summit. We incubated this event concept in Los Angeles, last year and have expanded the MultiScreen Summit to include Abu Dhabi and Berlin (which will be held in October). Our goal is to establish a global platform to address the growing needs of business to create a seamless digital experiences across their customers, fans, audiences, shoppers . . . screens.

So who owns this? CIO, CMO and CDO? CIO needs to get together with the CMO and the Chief Digital Officer (CDO) needs to become the Chief Disruptive Office (CDO) making backend process screens work with marketing engagement on the consumer screens.

Data has always been important. In a connect device world with location and behavioral
MultiScreen economy and media strategy will become the most important element tying a brands strategy in place.

The question is: How can buyers think horizontally across their consumer screens and add value to their vertical investments? We need to buy media both vertically and horizontally. Small screen buys need to have native mobile strategy attached that go beyond CPMs and drive mobile conversion goal into the cloud and into the mall.data, this consumer journey is more complex than we had assumed. We now know that we need to work harder to drive real shopper insights and shopper marketing goals. Data tools we can use now include location, screen insights and digital relationship building.

As the MultiScreen Summit Chair, I am so grateful to have such an remarkable group of media thought leaders onstage next week at the MultiScreen Summit, June 11th and 12th.  www.thescreensummit.com.

SCREEN WARS (Digital Media Forum Keynote 2013)

In Dubai talking to agencies and brands about “digital velcro”. How linking content seamlessly between one screen plus other consumer screen equals a multiple of value for a brand.  20  mins – view here.