Wild Turkeys and Mobile Innovation

Part II: Wild Turkeys (continuing from the Nov 26th post)

Here are three tips on identifying elusive innovation and finding a black swan. I had just returned knobbly kneed from a trip through South Asia and Russia. I attended three conferences and was just decompressing on Thanksgiving and felt obligated to continue the turkey analogy from the previous post.

1. Bottling Innovation

On the road at various industry events, the keynote always seems to start with innovation. The word has been peppered into panels and keynotes as in the place of the term “technology.” It is as if by magically by using the word “innovation” it will prime the techno-entrepreneur’s pump.

This is not a bad thing. It certainly gets the attention of the patriarchs. The Moscow Open Innovation Forum was keynoted by Dmitry Medvedev, prime minister of Russia, accompanied by the prime ministers of France and Finland. The World Summit Awards in Colombo, Sri Lanka, was opened by the country’s president, Mahinda Rajapaksa.

Innovation is associated with fresh ideas and out-with-the-old. At each event, the youth innovators are marched out bushy-tailed and bright-eyed. Mr. Medvedev and Virgin founder Sir Richard Branson posed smiling with the winning youth delegates.

The challenge is that while we all want to celebrate innovation, it is a difficult to bottle it. We find it hard to present it as a formula. Disruptive innovation is central for businesses that want to survive and stay competitive.

Incumbent players such as the wireless carrier want to appear light-footed and on the next wave, but the discussion generally gravitates to bemoaning the OTT competitors – that are never in the room – and proposing that the ecosystem is not sustainable.

There is unquestionably innovation, creativity and energy in the room, but we tend to present “wow,” and not the ingredients to cook up the same “wow” at home.

We chase mobile ideas to improve our retail business when, in fact, the sexiest thing about innovation is the resulting customers, sales and EBITDA.

2. Digital Inequality

Clearly, innovation is fueled by connectivity. I met with the Nikolai Nikiforov, Russian minister of communications and mass media and the youngest person in that country’s history to take over a ministerial position at the tender age of 29.

We talked about “digital inequality” in Russia and as well as other nations and how this is one of the biggest inhibitors of innovation. How can Russia future-proof its mobile network infrastructure to allow for universal access to high-speed Internet for the data-dependent business, education, health and entertainment services that will appear over the next decade?

“Electromagnetic spectrum is the crude oil of last-mile connectivity.” Mr. Nikiforov wants high-speed fiber with wireless relay into every community of 500 and above. The challenge is finding the funds and partnership.

When Peter Diamandis, the charismatic cofounder of Singularity University, took the stage, connectivity became a firebrand. “We have not started.” In ten years distance will mean nothing.

“Where you live and where you work do not need to be the same,” Mr. Diamandis said.

3. Crowd-Sourcing Innovation

So, for those of us that cannot cook up innovation, we know there is abundant creativity out there that we can tap into and global access and connectivity is making this possible. 

Apple has shown us that by creating a marketplace for ideas, developers have risen to the challenge. The app store is a case study in innovation: The smarts of Steve Jobs to provide an SDK and audience and the smarts of app shops globally in designing for every possible user need.

So there is much talk about how to best crowd-source innovation globally. After all the discussion of innovation and digital access, we can focus on harvesting business ideas that work.

Mr. Diamandis showed how his first X-Prize challenge of $10 million to build a reusable rocket to take humans into orbit generated more than $100 million in R&D.

This ability to link innovation with connectivity allows entrepreneurs such as Sascha Haselmayer, CEO of CityMart, to build a crowd-sourcing engine for more than 80 cities globally. His engine allows for ideas to be vetted and adopted all through a remote online process. Sascha’s engine is a blueprint for crowd sourcing retail innovation.

So innovation has a retail formula and it is:

Black Swan innovation = connectivity for all + a readily accessible global market place

From NYC NASDAQ discussing Apple, 9-1-1 and MultiScreens

10 minutes from NYC Nasdaq on Apple’s multiscreen announcements, next generation 9-1-1 (NG911) and the MultiScreen Summit. 

MultiScreen not Omniscreens or Second-Screen

I strongly believe that the space between the screens that allows the brand to connect their consumer experience is critical. I call this “digital Velcro”.  Connecting your consumer screens seamlessly throughout their day is one of the most important challenges we face.

Additionally, one media experience plus other media screen experience equals a multiple of value to the brand: “1+1=3”  This is not a second screen debate. It is a consumer journey challenge that impacts all brands and retailers in their media buying and engaging. That is why we focus on the MultiScreen not the Omniscreens or Second-Screen discussion.

Next week on Tuesday and Wednesday in NYC I will be hosting the MultiScreen Summit. We incubated this event concept in Los Angeles, last year and have expanded the MultiScreen Summit to include Abu Dhabi and Berlin (which will be held in October). Our goal is to establish a global platform to address the growing needs of business to create a seamless digital experiences across their customers, fans, audiences, shoppers . . . screens.

So who owns this? CIO, CMO and CDO? CIO needs to get together with the CMO and the Chief Digital Officer (CDO) needs to become the Chief Disruptive Office (CDO) making backend process screens work with marketing engagement on the consumer screens.

Data has always been important. In a connect device world with location and behavioral
MultiScreen economy and media strategy will become the most important element tying a brands strategy in place.

The question is: How can buyers think horizontally across their consumer screens and add value to their vertical investments? We need to buy media both vertically and horizontally. Small screen buys need to have native mobile strategy attached that go beyond CPMs and drive mobile conversion goal into the cloud and into the mall.data, this consumer journey is more complex than we had assumed. We now know that we need to work harder to drive real shopper insights and shopper marketing goals. Data tools we can use now include location, screen insights and digital relationship building.

As the MultiScreen Summit Chair, I am so grateful to have such an remarkable group of media thought leaders onstage next week at the MultiScreen Summit, June 11th and 12th.  www.thescreensummit.com.

Premature Technology Arousal (PTA) in Barcelona

To sum up Mobile World Congress 2013, I will borrow from Peter Marx, head of business development at Qualcomm Labs. Peter talks about a tendency for PTA or (for those in the know) Premature Technology Arousal in the mobile industry.

Much of the MWC 2013 floor area at the new Fira Gran Via venue exhibited PTA or Premature Technology Arousal. Solutions that are excited about being solutions. Solutions that are too early. Solutions that are missing reach and frequency. Things that are just not simple enough to drive adoption.

Even before 70 thousand executives hit the show floor, there were signs of “PTA”. From the Near Field Communications (NFC) show name tags that tried to emulated plastic (but that few used because you still needed to show the plastic) to tapping on Coke dispensers with cloud-base wallets that are many quarters away for mainstream adoption.

Booth after booth in this 1.01 million square feet techno-playground displayed incredible solutions and screens.  But the real story to follow was how each solution quietly added value to a given business ecosystem. There was an invisible hand playing connect the dots. Here are a few examples:

The Invisible Google Hand

Google was almost absent – unlike the MWC of 2011 and 2012 where Google groupies ran from partner booth to partner booth in search of cute Android pins. But Google was most definitely on the floor. This year the company is wisely playing “powered by Google”. They are the dark silent type. Turn left or right in every hall, Android is the fuel this industry is consuming.

The same holds for Qualcomm. They are the chip manufacture that is quietly taking the lion’s share of the revenue on each global handset. (Intel just cannot seem to create a competitive landscape.) Qualcomm Labs is building in consumer identity and credentials onto its “platform” hoping to not only power the connected device but also own the big data behind the user. When Qualcomm demos a vision of a home of the near future, they power many of the moving pieces.

The Samsung Show

While Qualcomm’s chip and Google’s OS were the main stories in Barcelona, another key and not so silent player is Samsung. (So much so that my hotel concierge asked me if I was attending that “Samsung” show that was in town.)  The word that floated above the white new-age Samsung booth was “innovation” but the innovation is not just the 3D camera or the ubiquity of the new S-Pen. The innovation was in their business model connecting their screen across the consumer journey. The 3D camera sells their tablet and television. The S-Pen and its SDK allows for ergonomic continuity across their new tablets and fablets.

Mozilla is other important story in Barcelona. Using the Firefox browser on lower-end ZTE devices to run the camera, map and  . . . oh ya the browser was a definite tech-turn on. Moving the developer and more importantly the consumer out of the (Apple-invented and dominated) app store into the real world super-app is an inevitable step and fundamental to our mobile evolution. The quicker the industry can move away for relying exclusively on industrial design and the app storefront as the sales tool, the faster we will grow.

2014 Screen Wars

The most important leitmotif was the screen. Not only the proliferation of devices with new form factor and appliance, but the realization that it is in the connecting of these screen that the we can accelerate business models. Samsung, ZTE, Motorola, Nokia all address the consumer journey across all screens and throughout their day. Nearly all marketing VPs had spent their last few months and budget trying to tell this consumer story.

Again while many products had indecent “PTA”, the most important insight was not what was happening on the screen but what companies were doing to connect them seamlessly. The new battle ground this year moving into MWC 2014 will be centered around who can best manage big data, wallet credentials and identity between the screens.

Dealing with Mobile Consumer Trust on April 24th

We are all excited about the potential for mobile wallets in the store and the cloud. The consumer can click permission for mobile services to track their location and scrape their social graph. These services allow for shopping and social convenience.  They allow for seamless, frictionless, realtime interaction with brands and retailers.

There however is an unwritten balance between convenience and trust. When does an location-based application like Highlight move from helping to spooking the would-be social consumer?

On April 24th in DC, join me to discuss how to build a consumer friendly ecosystem that is not dictated by legislation but rather by best practices, transparency and user-friendly signs for the consumer of the services.

There are high stakes. If the industry is not proactive in addressing this crucial issue, the fallout will be costly. Juniper Research recently stated that over $74 billion worth of contactless transactions will occur in three years and the privacy and security issues could cost billions.

Top high-level executives from leading online/mobile companies, content players, ad agencies and governmental agencies will gather to discuss the pressing privacy and security issues facing M-commerce and M-content.

MEF’s Mobile Commerce and Content Privacy Summit

When: April 24, 2012 from 2pm to 6pm, with a reception following
Where: 
SNR Denton’s DC Offices – Penthouse Suite 1301 K St NW Washington, D.C

For more information or to RSVP, please contact: Marjorie DeHey, GM MEF – North America 

SXSW roundup interview on BNN (Adult Spring Break)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It was “adult springbreak”. Lady Gaga, Bruce Springsteen, ACL, Venture Classmates, these are the names Gary Schwartz, President & CEO of Impact Mobile has been discussing in meetings at The South by Southwest (SXSW) Conference in Austin.

Watch interview here

Banking the UNBANKED in America with mobile (from Africa)

Does the mobile “cash” wallet popular across Africa make sense for the North American market?   

This is Part 1 in a two-part series in which Gary Schwartz explores the opportunity to service the large unbanked and underbanked population in North America through mobile wallet services. Part 1 explores the applicability of mobile wallet services offered in Zambia and other countries to the North American market.    FULL ARTICLE HERE

With approximately 60 million people unbanked (or underbanked) in North America, Africa has become a technology poster child for wireless carriers, retailers, and financial institutions that are trying to de-risk banking for the poor. But can mobile business models and banking solutions from Africa be transferred to main-street North America?

Full article here